Diagnostic Radiology Residency Program at Staten Island University Hospital

Message from the program director

It is with great enthusiasm that we welcome you to our Diagnostic Radiology Residency Program at Staten Island University Hospital. We have organized a top-caliber and highly desirable radiology residency program that is part of Northwell Health, New York state's largest healthcare provider.

Staten Island University Hospital is located  just minutes from the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge and is the fifth largest hospital in New York City. Our fully Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)-accredited program provides state-of-the-art education to our residents in an environment that emphasizes the role of doctor as caretaker, teacher and humanitarian.

We invite you to explore the opportunities that await you in our exceptional program.

Program overview

At the Diagnostic Radiology Residency Program at Staten Island University Hospital, residents are exposed to a comprehensive curriculum and rotate through all subspecialties of radiology. To prepare residents for the American Board of Radiology (ABR) core exam, we have revamped our core curriculum to encompass all subspecialties within radiology in the first 36 months of residency. The fourth year serves as an elective year, or "mini-fellowship" year. The first-year resident schedule is focused on mastering the core curriculum
necessary to prepare for independent call. A complete list of resident rotations can be found here .

Residents attend American Institute for Radiologic Pathology (AIRP) for one month. Research is strongly encouraged, and there is no shortage of opportunities. Each resident is required to complete one research project prior to graduation. If a resident is presenting a poster or presentation at a conference, the hospital will pay for all expenses.

Equipment:

The Radiology Department is a full-service department. Our equipment includes: 

  • One GE 3 Tesla MRI, two 1.5 Tesla MRI and one 0.3 Tesla open MRI
  • Five CT scanners including a Toshiba 320-slice capable of advanced cardiac imaging and three GE 64-slice scanners
  • GE PET/CT (newly installed 2017)
  • Two state-of-the-art biplane interventional suites
  • 6 nuclear medicine gamma cameras
  • Multiple GE Logiq E9 ultrasound machines
  • 4 fluoroscopy rooms, recently renovated with brand-new machines
  • Full-field digital mammography with CAD, stereotactic biopsy room, and breast MRI with biopsy
  • GE PACS, IDX, and PowerScribe 360 dictation system on all workstations. Reports are searchable via Montage, a powerful research tool.

Frequently asked questions

Is there an ESIR (early specialization in interventional radiology) program?

Yes. We were recently approved by the Radiology Residency Review Committee of the ACGME. The ESIR program will allow residents in diagnostic radiology to begin their IR training within their DR residency. Subsequently, only a single year of dedicated IR training is needed for board certification as opposed to two additional years for DR residents who did not participate in an ESIR-approved program.

Where do residents live?

Affordable housing is available in the immediate vicinity of the hospital. Currently, our residents live within the five boroughs and New Jersey. Staten Island is easily accessible from the other four boroughs and New Jersey via public transportation or by car.

Is Staten Island affordable?

Housing is not provided, but as mentioned above, housing is quite affordable in Staten Island.

Do you have PACS?

Yes. We currently use GE Centricity PACS. We are a fully digital department.

Do you have access to StatDX/RADPrimer/eAnatomy?

Yes, all residents have individual access to these resources.

How many beds are there at Staten Island University Hospital?

There are approximately 800 beds in total. 

Are residents expected to read every case?

The primary goal of the program is the education of the residents. Residents are encouraged to read as many cases as they are comfortable, according to their level of training.

What is the typical workflow?

Workflow varies depending on rotation. Responsibilities vary according to year. In the first year, residents always draft reports, which are reviewed with the attending prior to release. In the second year and beyond, residents release preliminary results, available to clinicians, prior to attending review. The goal of the program is ongoing teaching and side-by-side review of all cases with attendings.

Is there 24/7 attending coverage?

Yes, there is an in-house attending 24/7. However, the resident still acts independently on call.

Is there 24/7 ultrasound tech coverage?

Yes. Ultrasound techs perform all ultrasound exams, including on call. However, residents are encouraged to review scans in real time with the ultrasound techs and perform the scans themselves.

Is housing provided?

Housing is not provided, but as mentioned above, housing is quite affordable in Staten Island.

What benefits does the program offer?

•    Highly competitive salary – among the highest in the nation – with excellent health and dental insurance coverage. Note: PGY-II year corresponds to radiology year 1.

PGY Level

Base Salary 2017 – 2018

1

$70,000

2

$72,000

3

$74,000

4

$75,500

5

$77,000

•    $700 book fund per year – can be used on books or education material such as an iPad
•    Free lunch provided during conference
•    Free subscriptions to STATDx, RadPrimer, eAnatomy, Titan Radiology, and ABR Physics Review
•    Free Brandt and Helms textbook
•    Full reimbursement for all conference expenses for one conference per year at which the resident presents research. In addition, there is partial reimbursement or full reimbursement for conferences thereafter during the same year.

What are the moonlighting opportunities?

Moonlighting opportunities for second year residents and beyond are abundant, including inpatient coverage of Friday night shifts and moonlighting at our outpatient facility.

What radiology equipment does the hospital have?

Click here for a complete listing of the radiology equipment at Staten Island University Hospital.

Do the residents attend AIRP (American Institute for Radiologic Pathology)? Is it paid for?

Yes, residents attend the AIRP conference (formerly AFIP). Housing and tuition for the course are paid for by the program. Tuition and a $1,500 stipend is provided. 

Are away rotations allowed?

Yes. Our program is unique in its ability to allow residents to pursue outside rotations, which can be very beneficial for evaluating fellowship opportunities.

Global electives are available as well!

Is there a resident lounge? Call room? Library?

Yes, we have a spacious resident lounge that includes PACS reading stations, a coffee maker and a comfortable couch. A call room is available with private quarters. Our library has an extensive collection of radiology texts, journals and learning files.

What is the conference schedule?

See the conferences  page for more information.

What is the typical conference style?

Conferences include a case-based, didactic approach that encompass strategies geared toward the new ABR multiple choice board exam. Lecturers often utilize polling and multiple choice physics modules in their conferences.

What is the call schedule?

Beginning in the first year, residents participate in "buddy call" with a senior resident and attending from 5pm to 9pm during the first four months of residency. Subsequently, the first year continues buddy call with only the attending. Typically, buddy call for first years occurs once a week.

Beginning second year, seniors cover 39 weekend shifts and 4 holidays throughout the remainder of residency. Shifts include a 10am to 10pm Saturday day shift, a 10pm to 10am Saturday night shift, and a 10am to 10pm Sunday day shift. Friday nights are available as moonlighting shifts.

What is the night float schedule?

Residents complete 13 weeks of night float in total - seven weeks during second year, three weeks during third year, and three weeks during the fourth year. First years do not participate in night float. Night floats are from Sunday night to Thursday night, 9pm to 7am.

How many residents are in the program?

A total of 16 residents are in our program (four per year).

What are the applicant selection criteria?

Candidates are chosen on a diverse set of criteria with no one particular category emphasized. We are looking for well-rounded individuals who are strong academically and possess solid interpersonal skills.

Resident and faculty

Class of 2018

  • Melody Mar - University of Cincinnati College of Medicine
  • Amilcar Diaz - University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine
  • Avraham Zlochower - Drexel University College of Medicine
  • Nathan Chaya - SUNY Downstate College of Medicine

Class of 2019

  • Varun Chowdhary - University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston
  • Gregory Emmanuel - Albany Medical College
  • Varun Mehta - Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine
  • Suraj Parekh - Robert Wood Johnson Medical School

Class of 2020

  • Jesse Chen - Georgetown University School of Medicine
  • Danielle Del Re - Touro College of Osteopathic – Harlem NY
  • Jonathan Stern - Florida Atlantic University Charles Schmidt College of Medicine
  • Janice Thai "JT" - Stony Brook University School of Medicine

Class of 2021

  • Michelle Wu - New York Medical College
  • Amit Lloyd Ramjit - University of Florida College of Medicine
  • Daniel Eisman - Cooper Medical School of Rowan University
  • Daniel Luu - SUNY at Buffalo School of Medicine

Fellowships

Class of 2017

 

Ami Gokli

Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia - Pediatrics

Elliot Landau

Montefiore - Interventional Radiology

Dan Shilo

Mount Sinai - Interventional Radiology

Mike Shamis

University of Cincinnati - Mammography

Class of 2016

 

Ryan Logan Webb 

Children's National - Pediatric Radiology

Mike Coords 

UCSF - MSK

Steven Peti 

Mount Sinai - Body MRI

Quan La 

Stanford University - Pediatric Radiology

Class of 2015

 

David Krausz 

Montefiore - Interventional Radiology

Ruby Lukse 

Children's Hospital of Philadelphia - Pediatrics

Shrita Smith 

Hospital for Special Surgery -MSK

Cyril Varghese 

U. Penn - Body Imaging

Class of 2014

 

Avez Rizvi

Informatics - Sidra Medical and Research Center, Qatar

Conor Lowry

NYU - Cardiothoracic Imaging

Adam Bernheim

Harvard - Cardiothoracic Imaging

Oren Herman

Interventional Radiology

Class of 2013

 

Anusuya Mokashi

Duke - MSK

Vinh Phan

Hospital for Special Surgery – MSK

Jatin Zaveri

Yale – Body Imaging

Daniel Klein

University of Southern California – Neuroradiology

Class of 2012

 

Jose Morey

U. Penn – MSK

June Koshy

Johns Hopkins – Pediatric Radiology

Cheryl Lin

Stony Brook – MSK

Dan Machleder

Montefiore – Interventional Radiology

Jason DiPoce

Columbia – Body Imaging

Class of 2011

 

Philip McDonald

Duke University – MSK Radiology

Janice Hwang

NYU – Neuroradiology

David Aria

USC - Peds/ Peds IR - Phoenix Children’s Hospital

Class of 2010

 

Joseph Platnick

Yale - Neuroradiology

Neil Lester

Harvard MGH - Pediatric Radiology

Jeremy Neuman

Cincinnati Children’s Hospital – Pediatric Radiology

Leonid Lempert

Columbia - MSK Radiology

Class of 2009

 

Omar John Arnuk

Beth Israel - Neuroradiology

Jade L’Heureux

Cornell - Interventional Radiology / Air Force

Joseph Friedman

Montefiore – Interventional Radiology

Jacob Gebrael

Emory Healthcare - Interventional Radiology

Faculty

Attending

Title

Subspecialty

Dr. Mark Raden

Chairman of Radiology

Chief of Neuroradiology

Neuroradiology

VIR

Dr. Shirley Hanna

Associate Chair of Department

Chief of Musculoskeletal Imaging

Musculoskeletal

Mammography

Dr. Jonathan Scheiner

Associate Chairman for Operations

VIR

Dr. Carolyn Raia

Associate Chairman of Ambulatory Imaging and Director of Breast Imaging

Mammography

Dr. Jeremy Neuman

Associate Chair of Department

Chief of Pediatric Radiology

Pediatric Radiology

Dr. David Sarkany 

Residency Program Director

Body Imaging

Dr. Noor Ahmad

Chief of Interventional Radiology

VIR    

Dr. David Geller

Attending Radiologist

VIR

Dr. Christopher Giordano

Attending Radiologist

VIR

Dr. Gail Yarmish

Chief of Body Imaging

Body Imaging

Dr. Richa Sharma

Attending Radiologist

Body Imaging

Dr. Morris Hayim

Attending Radiologist

Body Imaging

Dr. June Koshy

Attending Radiologist

Pediatric Radiology

Dr. Salvatore Farruggia

Attending Radiologist

Pediatric Radiology

Dr. Mamatha Gowda

Chief of Cardiac Imaging

Chest Imaging

Cardiac Imaging

Dr. Haneen Ali

Attending Radiologist

Chest Imaging

Cardiac Imaging

Dr. Arnold Brenner

Chief of Nuclear Medicine

Nuclear Medicine

Dr. Devayani Patel

Attending Radiologist

Nuclear Medicine

Dr. Steven Peti

Attending Radiologist

Nuclear Medicine

Body Imaging

Dr. Marlena Jbara

Attending Radiologist

Musculoskeletal

Dr. Cheryl Lin

Chief of Ultrasound

Musculoskeletal

Ultrasound

Dr. Joseph Lowry

Chief of Thoracic Imaging

Chief of Fluoroscopy

Chest Imaging

Fluoroscopy

Dr. Henry McPherson

Attending Radiologist

Fluoroscopy

Ultrasound

Dr. Spencer Serras

Attending Radiologist

Neuroradiology

Dr. Janice Hwang

Attending Radiologist

Neuroradiology

Dr. Daniel Klein

Attending Radiologist

Neuroradiology

Dr. Lynne Voutsinas    

Attending Radiologist

Neuroradiology

Dr. Dayna Williams

Attending Radiologist

Mammography

Dr. Eric Trenkmann

Attending Radiologist

Mammography

Dr. Yolande Kwok

Attending Radiologist

Mammography

Body Imaging

Dr. Ryan Logan Webb

Attending Radiologist

Emergency Radiology

Pediatric Radiology

Dr. Leonid Lempert

Attending Radiologist

Emergency Radiology Mammography

Dr. Jatin Zaveri

Attending Radiologist

Emergency Radiology

Body Imaging

Fellowships

Class of 2016

    Ryan Logan Webb - Children's National, Pediatric Radiology
    Mike Coords - UCSF, MSK
    Steven Peti - Mount Sinai, Body MRI
    Quan La - Stanford University, Pediatric Radiology

Class of 2015

    David Krausz - Montefiore, Interventional Radiology
    Ruby Lukse - Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Pediatrics
    Shrita Smith - Hospital for Special Surgery, MSK
    Cyril Varghese - U. Penn, Body Imaging

Class of 2014  
Avez Rizvi Informatics - Sidra Medical and Research Center, Qatar
Conor Lowry NYU - Cardiothoracic Imaging
Adam Bernheim Harvard - Cardiothoracic Imaging
Oren Herman Interventional Radiology
Class of 2013  
Anusuya Mokashi Duke -- MSK
Vinh Phan Hospital for Special Surgery – MSK
Jatin Zaveri Yale – Body Imaging
Daniel Klein University of Southern California – Neuroradiology
Class of 2012  
Jose Morey U. Penn – MSK
June Koshy Johns Hopkins – Pediatric Radiology
Cheryl Lin Stony Brook – MSK
Dan Machleder Montefiore – Interventional Radiology
Jason DiPoce Columbia – Body Imaging
Class of 2011  
Philip McDonald Duke University – MSK Radiology
Janice Hwang NYU – Neuroradiology
David Aria USC - Peds/ Peds IR - Phoenix Children’s Hospital
Class of 2010  
Joseph Platnick Yale - Neuroradiology
Neil Lester Harvard MGH - Pediatric Radiology
Jeremy Neuman Cincinnati Children’s Hospital – Pediatric Radiology
Leonid Lempert Columbia - MSK Radiology
Class of 2009  
Omar John Arnuk Beth Israel - Neuroradiology
Jade L’Heureux Cornell - Interventional Radiology / Air Force
Joseph Friedman Montefiore – Interventional Radiology
Jacob Gebrael Emory Healthcare - Interventional Radiology

 

Rotations

General Radiology / Fluoroscopy - Dr. Lowry - 12 weeks

During this rotation, the resident becomes experienced in performing and interpreting a variety of fluoroscopic procedures, including esophagrams, upper GI studies, small bowel follow-through, barium enemas, hysterosalpingograms, cystograms and t-tube cholangiograms.

Thoracic Radiology - Dr. Lowry - 12 weeks

As a first year resident, the focus of this rotation is on becoming proficient at interpreting chest X-rays. Chest CT studies, as well as PE studies, are read as the resident progresses in training. CT lung cancer screening is also incorporated into this rotation. Cardiac radiology involves directing and interpreting performance of cardiac CT and MRI.

Cardiac Radiology - Dr. Gowda - 10 weeks

During this rotation, the resident is exposed to CTA Cardiac studies as well as cardiac MRIs. A large number of studies are read from the emergency department as well as inpatient services. It is possible for the resident to obtain a level III certification if he/she chooses to complete a mini-fellowship in fourth year.

Body imaging - Dr. Yarmish - 12 weeks

The resident is responsible for reading most CT studies performed in the ER during the day. As Staten Island University Hospital is a Level I trauma center, residents become proficient in all trauma emergencies. In addition to routine studies, senior residents will become familiar with MRCP, CT urograms, MR enterography/defacograph, and other advanced MR imaging.

Nuclear Medicine/PET imaging - Dr. Brenner - 16 weeks

This department performs all types of nuclear studies, including HIDA scans, V-Q scans, GI bleeding scans, bone scans, WBC scans, gallium scans, indium scans, cardiac studies, thyroid scans and ablation, and renal studies. Localization of sentinel nodes prior to breast surgery is also performed. At our outpatient center, residents interpret PET scans.

Neuroradiology - Dr. Raden - 12 weeks

First year residents will focus on the interpretation of CT scans of the head to prepare for independent call. Subsequently, residents will learn advanced CT/MR covering all aspects of brain, spine, and head and neck imaging. Lumbar punctures and CT myelograms under fluoroscopic guidance are routinely performed.

Ultrasound - Dr. Lin - 12 weeks

This rotation exposes the resident to a large range of ultrasound examinations. In addition to interpreting the studies, residents are expected to work with the technologists to become comfortable in scanning patients themselves.

Pediatrics - Dr. Neuman - 12 weeks

In addition to interpreting all pediatric studies performed in the hospital, the resident will gain experience in performing fluoroscopy studies (barium enema, small-bowel series, VCUG, cystograms) as well as ultrasound studies (spine, cerebral, hips). Residents participate in interdisciplinary rounds with the pediatric department to review NICU and floor patient studies daily.

Musculoskeletal Imaging - Dr. Hanna - 12 weeks

First year residents will focus on interpreting plain radiographs in the emergency and outpatient setting. More senior residents focus on MR imaging and procedures such as arthrograms and joint injections, primarily in the outpatient setting.

Interventional radiology - Dr. Ahmad - 12 weeks

This busy department performs numerous interventional procedures, including mesenteric angiograms, renal angiograms, radio- and chemo-embolizations, uterine artery embolizations, TIPS, nephrostomy and ureteral stent placement, lower extremity angiograms, venograms, chemotherapy/dialysis catheter, PICC placements, and CT guided biopsies and drainages.

ESIR trainees: In the final year of DR residency, the resident will participate in an additional five months of interventional radiology as well as additional IR related rotations such as ICU, gastroenterology and cardiology.

Breast imaging - Dr. Raia - 12 weeks

The resident will spend his/her time in the Breast Imaging Center learning to interpret mammograms, ultrasounds and MRIs of the breast. The resident will also learn to perform breast biopsy procedures.

Night float / Emergency Radiology - 13 weeks

Night float begins in the second year. Overnight, an in-house overnight attending is available to assist the resident. An ultrasound technologist is in-house 24/7 to perform all ultrasound studies.

Conference schedule

Daily lunchtime conferences provide formal didactic and case-based learning experiences. Conferences are tailored toward the new ABR computer-based exam. Lunch is provided by the department. The conference room utilizes all modern display equipment including a large-screen projector, wireless keyboard and mouse, and a PACS-compatible computer system for easy presentation of cases.

There are two 45-minute conferences a day. Additionally, residents attend a physics lecture weekly, and first-years attend a weekly conference which reviews the introductory radiology book Brandt and Helms. The residents also can attend other multidisciplinary conferences in chest, neurology, mammography and pediatrics.

An example of our current schedule is below:

 

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

7:30am – 8:30am

 

 

Interventional Radiology

(alternating)

 

 

12:00pm -  12:45pm

Neuroradiology

Body Imaging

Ultrasound

Chest

Mammography

(alternating)

Cardiac

(alternating)

12:45pm - 1:30pm

MSK

Nuclear Medicine

(alternating)

Tumor Board

(weekly)

Journal Club

(once monthly)

Pediatric

Interesting Case Conference
(once monthly)

M&M

(once monthly)

Every other year, we participate in the ACR RLI economics program. In addition, we have a quality / patient safety curriculum with lectures every 2 months.

Research

Our program offers abundant research opportunities for residents, who are required to undertake at least one research project during residency. Some of the most recent research publications include work within nuclear medicine, interventional radiology, imaging informatics, cardiothoracic imaging and mammography. 

(718) 226-8297
Get in touch with us!

Applicants invited for interview will be notified by email. For additional information on how to apply contact Genevieve Ebbro.

Email the Diagnostic Radiology Residency Program

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