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First on LI: Atrial fibrillation clinical trial available at Southside Hospital

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WaveCrest trial examines effectiveness at limiting blood clots

BAY SHORE, NY —

Southside Hospital is the only medical center on Long Island that has been selected to participate in Biosense Webster Inc.’s clinical trial evaluating the safety and effectiveness of a new device designed to reduce stroke risk in atrial fibrillation patients.

The WaveCrest Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) Trial is evaluating the effectiveness of the WaveCrest Left Atrial Appendage Occlusion (LAAO) System in closing off a small sack of tissue on the muscle wall – called the left atrial appendage – where most stroke-causing blood clots form. Patients who are treated with the WaveCrest device are not required to continue taking anticoagulants or blood thinners after the procedure, a key benefit to people who cannot tolerate this medication.

The WaveCrest clinical trial is one offering of Southside Heart & Lung, the hospital’s program that includes cardiology, cardiac surgery and thoracic surgery.

“Southside Hospital is always exploring and evaluating the newest technology and clinical trials available so we can offer our patients the latest and greatest treatment options,” said Jason Chinitz, MD, director of cardiac electrophysiology at Southside Hospital. “As the only participant in this clinical trial on Long Island, we’re excited to offer atrial fibrillation patients the opportunity to benefit from this new technology.”

The WaveCrest Left Atrial Appendage Occlusion System closes off a small sack of tissue on the muscle wall – called the left atrial appendage – where most stroke-causing blood clots form.
The WaveCrest Left Atrial Appendage Occlusion System closes off a small sack of tissue on the muscle wall – called the left atrial appendage – where most stroke-causing blood clots form.

Atrial fibrillation affects millions

There are two other medical centers based in Manhattan that are participating in this clinical trial.

Atrial fibrillation is expected to affect between six and 12 million people in the United States by 2050, according to the Journal of Geriatric Cardiology. People with atrial fibrillation are five times more likely to suffer a stroke than someone without cardiac issues, the American Stroke Association said.

Irregular heartbeats are typically diagnosed by an electrocardiologist such as Dr. Chinitz. Southside Hospital’s Barbara Shannon, RN, who recently became Northwell Health’s first senior research nurse, is the research nurse coordinator for this clinical trial, as part of Northwell's Feinstein Institutes for Medical Research.

“Having Northwell Health’s first senior research nurse regularly evaluating new innovations and opportunities for our patients will only further strengthen the cutting-edge care Southside Hospital provides to the residents of Suffolk County,” said Donna Moravick, NP, Southside Hospital’s executive director.

For more information about Southside Heart & Lung, call (631) 968-3525 or go to https://southside.northwell.edu/southside-heart-lung.

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