Epilepsy (Convulsive and Non-Convulsive)

Convulsive Epilepsy

Convulsive Epilepsy is a neurological disorder diagnosed when a person has recurring seizures due to an overstimulation or disruption of nerve cell activity in the brain. In this type of epilepsy, seizures involve the entire body, are involuntary and include a sudden onset of violent, rapid contraction and relaxation of body muscles, shaking, loss of consciousness, difficulty breathing, loss of bowel/bladder control and confusion. They usually last a few minutes.

Treatment for convulsive epilepsy usually begins with anti-seizure medication, but may also include surgery, dietary therapies, and/or other options tailored to the individual.

Non-convulsive Epilepsy

Non-convulsive Epilepsy is a neurological disorder diagnosed when a person has recurring seizures due to an overstimulation or disruption of nerve cell activity in the brain. People with this disorder do not experience a loss of consciousness with violent muscle spasms typically associated with epilepsy, but have seizures that can be nearly undetectable. A facial twitch often occurs along with what appears as absent-mindedness, a lack of attention, and/or a blank stare. These seizures will present without warning or post-episodic symptoms and will last only a few seconds.

Treatment for non-convulsive epilepsy usually begins with anti-seizure medication, but may also include other options tailored to the individual.

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The Epilepsy Center of Northwell Health Neuroscience Institute improves lives by providing treatments for a wide range of neurological disorders and diseases.