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An abdominal aortic aneurysm, also called AAA or triple A, is a bulging, weakened area in the wall of the abdominal aorta (the largest artery in the body) resulting in an abnormal widening or ballooning greater than 50 percent of the vessel's normal diameter (width)...


Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the gradual narrowing or blockage of the coronary arteries that supply blood to the heart. It is the most common cause of heart disease and is the major reason people have heart attacks...


The aorta, the body's largest artery, extends upward from the top of the left ventricle of the heart (ascending thoracic aorta), then curves like a candy cane (aortic arch) downward (descending thoracic aorta) into the abdomen (abdominal aorta)...


Valvular heart disease occurs when the heart's valves that control blood flow do not work properly. Valvular conditions can be present at birth or can be acquired later in life, resulting in valvular stenosis or valvular regurgitation...


The aortic valve connects the heart’s main pumping chamber (left ventricle) and the aorta, which carries oxygenated blood to the brain and the rest of the body...


Coronary arteries are the blood vessels that supply blood directly to your heart muscle. Arterial blockage often can be diagnosed using a cardiac catheterization...


Bacterial endocarditis is a rare but serious infection in the heart and/or valves. While this infection usually is associated with certain types of congenital heart defects, it also can occur in structurally normal hearts...


The aortic valve is the valve between the heart’s main pumping chamber (the left ventricle) and the aorta, which carries oxygenated blood to the brain and body...


Carotid artery disease occurs when there is damage to the inner layers of the arteries, which supply blood to the brain. Approximately 30 percent of strokes are caused by narrowing or blockages in the carotid arteries on either side of the neck...


Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the accumulation of fatty deposits in the inner layer of the coronary arteries. The fatty deposits may begin to develop in childhood and they continue to thicken and enlarge during a person’s lifetime...