Conditions: Environmental and occupational health

7 results

Inorganic arsenic compounds are used to preserve wood, as pesticides and in some industries. Arsenic can get into air, water and the ground from wind-blown dust...


Asbestos is a mineral fiber that was added to many buildings and to certain products for strengthening, heat insulation and fire resistance. Most products today are not made with asbestos...


Carbon monoxide can be created whenever a fuel (such as wood, gasoline, coal, natural gas or kerosene) is burning. Breathing in carbon monoxide fumes not only prevents oxygen from being used properly by the body, but also causes harm to the central nervous system...


Lead is a naturally occurring metal that has been spread through the environment in many ways. Lead used to be in paint and gasoline and can still be found in contaminated soil, household dust, drinking water, lead-glazed pottery and some metal jewelry...


There are three different forms of mercury that cause health problems: elemental mercury (also known as liquid mercury or quick silver), inorganic mercury salts and organic mercury...


Occupational asthma is often a reversible condition, which means the symptoms may disappear when the irritants that caused the asthma are avoided. However, permanent damage can result if the person experiences prolonged exposure...


Many thousands of rescue, recovery and clean-up workers, as well as volunteers, were exposed to the hazardous fumes at Ground Zero (as the site has come to be known) during the days and months after the 9/11 attacks...