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Kevin Tracey, MD, wearing a blue and black tie
President and CEO, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research
Feinstein Institutes for Medical Research

Executive Vice President, Research
Northwell Health

Professor of Neurosurgery and Molecular Medicine
Donald and Barbara Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell

Kevin Tracey is president of the Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, and professor of molecular medicine and neurosurgery at the Zucker School of Medicine. He is a leader in the study of the molecular basis of inflammation.

Dr. Tracey and his colleagues identified the neural mechanism for controlling the immunological responses to infection and injury, and developed devices to replace anti-inflammatory drugs in clinical trials of rheumatoid arthritis — a burgeoning field termed bioelectronic medicine.

Since 1992 he has directed the Laboratory of Biomedical Science in Manhasset, where in 2005 he was appointed president of the Feinstein Institute. He lectures nationally and internationally on inflammation, sepsis, the neuroscience of immunity and bioelectronic medicine. He is the author of Fatal Sequence (Dana Press) and more than 320 scientific papers.

The recipient of numerous awards and honors, including an honorary degree from the Karolinska Institute, Dr. Tracey is a Fellow in the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and a member in the American Society for Clinical Investigation, and the Association of American Physicians. He is cofounder and Councilor of the Global Sepsis Alliance.

Dr. Tracey graduated summa cum laude from Boston College, majoring in chemistry, and received his MD from Boston University. He trained in neurosurgery at the New York Hospital/Cornell University Medical Center, and was guest investigator at the Rockefeller University. 

The latest news for Kevin Tracey, MD
The Feinstein Institutes for Medical Research recently hosted a Match Lecture by 2014 Nobel Laureate in Physiology or Medicine John O'Keefe, MA, PhD, who discussed the idea that the hippocampus is a cognitive map.
Feinstein Institutes Professor Betty Diamond, MD, and her colleagues identified 21 subsets of leukocytes active in diseases.
Female scientists received more than $455,000 in awards during the eighth annual Advancing Women in Science and Medicine luncheon to celebrate and support excellence and achievements of women in science.
Top cancer specialists attended the Feinstein Institute for Medical Research Brain Tumor Biotech Summit to exchange promising new therapies in the treatment of brain tumors and central nervous system diseases.